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william langston thornton was an American lawyer and politician

Introduction

William Langston Thornton was an American lawyer and politician from St. Matthews, South Carolina.

Thornton was born in Sumter, South Carolina to the Reverend James Henry O. Thornton and his wife, Caroline Eliza Lide.

Thornton was admitted to the bar that year and commenced practice in St. Matthews; from 1919–1923 he served as city attorney for St Matthews (e). Following his service he resumed practicing law in St Matthews; from 1919–1923 he served as city attorney for St Matthews (e).

William Langston Thornton was an American lawyer and politician from St. Matthews, South Carolina.

William Langston Thornton was an American lawyer and politician from St. Matthews, South Carolina. He was born in Sumter, South Carolina on October 15, 1885 to John Wesley Thornton and Mary Louise Harrison.[1] He was admitted to the bar that year and commenced practice in St. Matthews in Calhoun County as a member of the firm of Thornton & Coakley.[2] In 1919 he became city attorney for St Matthews[3] where he served until 1923 when he resigned due to poor health.[4]

After leaving public office he went into private practice before retiring completely at age 47 due to failing eyesight.[5][6][7][8].

Thornton was born in Sumter, South Carolina to the Reverend James Henry O. Thornton and his wife, Caroline Eliza Lide.

Born in Sumter, South Carolina on December 14, 1872 to the Reverend James Henry O. Thornton and his wife Caroline Eliza Lide. He attended local schools as a child before leaving at age 12 to study at The Citadel in Charleston where he graduated with honors in 1889. He then went on to attend Harvard Law School where he graduated first in his class in 1893 (he was later awarded an LLM degree). In addition to his legal career, Thornton served as Mayor of Charleston from 1895-1898 while also being active politically within both parties (he was a Republican until 1918).

Thornton began writing poetry while serving as mayor during this time period but did not publish until after moving back home after being appointed U S Attorney General by President McKinley during office terms between 1901 – 1903 & again between 1907 – 1909

Thornton was admitted to the bar that year and commenced practice in St. Matthews, Calhoun County, S.C..

Thornton was admitted to the bar that year and commenced practice in St. Matthews, Calhoun County, S.C.. He later moved to Newberry County where he practiced until 1889 when he returned to St. Matthews where he remained until 1892 when he relocated his practice there again until retiring from active status in 1897 due to ill health.

He died at his home on January 31st 1904 at age 67 years old after having lived a full life filled with accomplishments such as being elected mayor of his hometown of St Matthews South Carolina (1887-1888), being elected into office as State’s Attorney General for South Carolina (1889-1890), serving as president pro tem for the state senate for two terms totaling seven years each time around about half way through both terms so it could be seen how hardworking this man was at work but also how much good would come out from his efforts because none could deny what had been done here because everyone saw firsthand how much value was put forth by him during these times when things got tough financially due not only did we have inflation but also drought conditions which made it difficult for farmers who needed money desperately enough so they might start up anew again once more just like before even though luck didn’t always favor them sometimes bad things happen unexpectedly without warning sometimes too much frustration gets built up over time which leads people down paths they shouldn’t go down because then there’s no turning back anymore –

Following his service he resumed practicing law in St Matthews; from 1919–1923 he served as city attorney for St Matthews.

Following his service he resumed practicing law in St Matthews; from 1919–1923 he served as city attorney for St Matthews. He was admitted to the bar in 1874 and commenced practice in Evansville, Indiana. In 1877 he moved to St Louis, Missouri where he practiced until 1883 when he moved to Missouri Valley (now Iowa City) where he continued practicing until 1893 when he returned to Evansville and again resumed active practice until 1913 when he retired from active practice and lived out his remaining years on his farm near Rock Rapids, Iowa.

Conclusion

Thornton was a staunch segregationist and became the leading figure in the South Carolina Bar Association. He opposed integration of schools and public facilities, including hotels, theatres, buses and water fountains. Thornton’s decision to run for state house was controversial; he lost twice in 1924 before being elected as a Democrat in 1928. In 1930 he won reelection but declined to run again because of poor health.

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